Beware the 'I' storm: It has more retirees than any other letter used for Atlantic hurricane names

11 'I' storms have been retired in the Atlantic – 9 of them since 2001

Hurricane Ida crashed ashore in Louisiana on Aug. 29 with maximum sustained winds of 150 mph, a Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

Preliminary reports suggest Ida was tied for the fifth-strongest hurricane to ever make landfall in the continental United States in terms of maximum wind speeds. The storm also produced tremendous storm-surge and rainfall flooding along the northern Gulf Coast.

It's probably a safe bet that the World Meteorological Organization will vote to retire the name Ida from future use in the Atlantic Basin. A storm's name can be retired if its impacts were particularly destructive and/or deadly. This would avoid the use of Ida, for example, for a future Atlantic "I" storm that might not even become a hurricane or affect any land areas.

Interestingly, more storms starting with "I" have been retired than a name beginning with any other letter.

THE BEASTS OF THE ATLANTIC: 93 HURRICANE OR TROPICAL STORM NAMES HAVE BEEN RETIRED

Since this retirement practice began in 1954, 11 "I" storms have been retired by the WMO. Tied for second place are "C" and "F" storms, each with nine retirees.

Nine of the 11 retired "I" storms have all occurred since 2001, as FOX 5 DC meteorologist Sue Palka noted on Twitter.

An average Atlantic hurricane season spawns 14 named storms, according to NOAA's most recent 30-year period of record (1991-2020). The "I" storm is the ninth of the season, so that means we can expect an "I" essentially every year.

Satellites began monitoring the entire Atlantic Basin in 1966, and 35 of the 55 hurricane seasons since then have reached the "I" storm. 

Based on data from NOAA and the National Hurricane Center, Sept. 18 was the average date the "I" storm formed in those 35 seasons. The earliest was June 28 (2020) and the latest was Oct. 13 (1999).

HERE'S WHY THE ATLANTIC HURRICANE SEASON RUNS FROM JUNE TO NOVEMBER

The mid-September period, when the "I" storm typically forms, is the peak of hurricane season. This is when environmental conditions tend to be most favorable for tropical cyclone development: water temperatures are at their highest across the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico; wind shear – the change in wind speed and direction with height that can rip apart developing tropical cyclones – is usually low; and tropical waves emerging off western Africa are often very robust.

When all of those conditions come into alignment, it's a "recipe" for strong hurricanes to develop and track hundreds of miles across the Atlantic Basin.

Unfortunately, the "I" storm just happens to come during this "recipe for disaster."

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