Record-breaking temperatures expected for millions in country’s midsection this week

Temperatures for millions of people could be 10 to 20 degrees above average through Wednesday.

For the last full day of summer, Wednesday, the Plains and Mid-south continue to bake. Record heat hangs on even though we are well into meteorological fall. Relief is on the way though.

The FOX Forecast Center expects temperatures to continue to cause the midsection of the country to swelter before a cold front sweeps through the region to provide much-needed relief from the heat.

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"We're sitting well above average, anywhere from 10 to 20 degrees warmer than normal, especially in the central Plains," FOX Weather meteorologist Jane Minar said. "The reason for this, we've got a big ridge of high pressure, and that's going to be parked over the central U.S."

So, what does it mean when high pressure is sitting above our heads?

"With high pressure, we actually have a sinking of air," Minar said. "As air sinks down to the surface, it compresses and heats up. And so that's what's going to bring our temperatures above average. We do have the potential for some record-breakers here."

It's going to feel like the middle of summer for a large portion of the central U.S.

Monday and Tuesday logged record-breaking for many cities including Kansas City, Missouri; Salt Lake City; Des Moines, Iowa and Cape Girardeau, Missouri. 

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More cities will flirt with record highs Wednesday again from the Plains to the South East. Look for triple digits across Oklahoma, Arkansas and Tennessee. Extreme heat even stretches to the eastern seaboard. 

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Potential record-high temperatures for Wednesday.
(FOX Weather)


 

Thursday cools down across the Midwest and northern Plains. The southern tier even drops a few degrees as a cold front presses into the Mississippi Valley. By Friday almost everyone cools down.

The extreme temperatures are later in the year than typical, but the FOX Forecast Center warns as long as the Pacific typhoon season is active, irregularities are common in weather patterns across North America.

The remnants of typhoons, such as Merbok that blasted Alaska with hurricane-force winds and 50-foot seas, can help alter jet stream patterns, leading to deep dips and large bulges in the jet stream.

A series of typhoons that continue to impact the Western Pacific means the U.S. might be in store for more extreme weather over the next several weeks.

Seasonal and monthly outlooks from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have already alluded to temperatures during October and the fall season being above average for most of the country.

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