Celia could become a hurricane later this week as it parallels Mexico’s western coast

While all is quiet in the Atlantic, the Eastern Pacific is getting ready for another hurricane

Celia might have weakened to a tropical depression Friday night, but it's expected to regain tropical storm strength on Tuesday and could even become a hurricane by the end of the week.

As of midday Monday, Celia had maximum sustained winds of only 30 mph and was located more than 300 miles south of Salina Cruz, Mexico. The tropical depression was moving west-southwestward at 8 mph.

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The current status of Celia from the latest National Hurricane Center advisory.
(FOX Weather)


 

The National Hurricane Center expects Celia to begin a gradual strengthening trend by early Tuesday, likely becoming a tropical storm Tuesday afternoon or evening.

Celia will move generally westward for the next day or two before making a turn toward the west-northwest by midweek.

Current projections by the NHC indicate Celia will strengthen into a hurricane late Thursday or early Friday as it stays well offshore but moves parallel to the western coast of Mexico.

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The storm is not expected to bring any impacts to land, but Celia will be a hazard for any ships passing through this area of the Eastern Pacific.

The projected path and intensity of Celia from the latest National Hurricane Center advisory.
(FOX Weather)


 

To the northwest of Celia, Blas, a hurricane last week, has fallen apart and is now simply a remnant area of low pressure several hundred miles off Mexico's western coast.

The system should dissipate over the open waters of the Eastern Pacific by Wednesday.

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An overview of the tropics in the Eastern Pacific.
(FOX Weather)


 

Atlantic

Meanwhile, the tropics are on snooze in the Atlantic this week. No areas are being monitored for potential development over the next five days.

Saharan dust traveling from western Africa across the tropical Atlantic, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico will continue to inhibit tropical development in the near-term future.

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The windy, dry Saharan Air Layer suppresses tropical development in the Atlantic Basin.
(FOX Weather)


 

What you will see instead of tropical storms and hurricanes are colorful sunrises and sunsets as the dust scatters the sun's rays.

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