Magnitude 3.8 quake shakes Buffalo-area residents out of bed Monday; strongest to hit New York in 21 years

USGS data shows Monday's 3.8-magnitude quake was the strongest in New York state since 2002. It was also the fourth-strongest earthquake on record for the western New York region.

WEST SENECA, N.Y. – Residents of western New York got an early wakeup call Monday when a magnitude 3.8 earthquake rattled the Buffalo area.

According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the quake struck at 6:15 a.m. EST and was centered 1.2 miles east-northeast of West Seneca, less than 10 miles from downtown Buffalo.

Monday's earthquake had a depth of 1.9 miles and was reportedly felt as far north as Niagara Falls and as far south as Orchard Park, according to Erie County Deputy Commissioner Gregory Butcher.

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The temblor was captured on a security camera inside a Buffalo home, where a loud crash and a barking dog could be heard immediately following the shaking.

According to officials, there were no immediate reports of injuries across the shaken area.

"It felt like a car hit my house in Buffalo," Erie County Executive Mark Poloncarz wrote on Twitter shortly after the quake. "I jumped out of bed."

USGS data shows Monday's 3.8-magnitude quake was the strongest in New York state since 2002, when a magnitude 5.3 struck near Au Sable Forks in the northeastern portion of the state. It was also the fourth-strongest earthquake on record for the western New York region.

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