Children rescued after falling through thin ice at Colorado lake

Ice isn’t considered thick enough to comfortably walk onto until it is at least it is four inches thick.

DOUGLAS COUNTY, Colo. – A thin sheet of ice on a lake outside of Denver was not sturdy enough to support the weight of four children before giving way Tuesday afternoon, causing fire rescue to respond with a dive team to help pull the children out of the cold water.

The West Metro Fire Rescue Department said they responded to a lake near Colorado's Roxborough State Park after receiving reports that four children fell into a pond.

Upon arrival, they found three children being attended to by neighbors who used hoses, extension cords and rope to get the victims out of the pond.

The West Metro Fire Rescue Department said a fourth child required the rescue from its dive team.

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Firefighters successfully pulled the teen out of the water and onto shore, where he was attended to by paramedics and transported to a local medical center.

First responders believe all the children will be okay and Colorado Parks & Wildlife encouraged all residents to be aware of ice and weather conditions before venturing out.

Ice can start to form when the air temperature drops below 32° F, but it takes an extended cold period for the frozen water to become thick enough to venture out onto.

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Rangers said that there is no such thing as safe ice, but there are guidelines that, if followed, can reduce the risk of falling through.

CPW says a shallow lake will freeze faster than a deeper waterway, but ice thickness is not consistent. About four inches or more of solid ice is needed for walking, and when the level reaches about a foot, it can sustain a small or midsize vehicle.

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