Dude, where’s my car? How to successfully dig your car out from the snow, after you find it

A typical car is less than 5 feet tall

Snowdrifts of more than three feet can easily bury a car and leave owners wondering how they can even start on what seems to be the unimaginable process of trying to remove their vehicle from all the snow.

Luckily, the travel experts at AAA know a thing or two about vehicles and have some advice for cars owners who find themselves in the snowy predicament.

Experts say before you begin to dig your car out, make sure to have the right tools to get the job done. A shovel and either an ice scrape or a brush will be necessary to start the process.

Depending on how deep the snowdrift encompasses your car, the job may also require some sort of ice melting chemical or sand to help improve the terrain around your car.

AAA suggests that you first use the tools and chemicals to clear a path around the vehicle- this will provide you with better access for clearing the roof and the windshields.

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After the car is clear, experts suggest you return to the ground and remove as much snow as possible from in front of and behind the wheels.

Once a significant amount of snow has been removed from around the tires, AAA says people tend to have luck by starting to slowly back up and then driving forwards over the recently compacted snow.

This back and forth motion may need to be completed several times before you are able to free the car from the grasps of the snow pile.

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Experts warn to always keep the steering wheel straight and never allow the tires to spin wildly.

If efforts don’t work, you may need to wait for the snow to melt or a plow truck to help clear a better path.

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